Raindrops are shaped like hamburger buns


raindrop

Burgers really are everywhere. A new study finds that raindrops are shaped like hamburger buns, not tears as previously thought:

“The teardrop shape of a raindrop has been accepted as fact for generations and has even inspired songwriters over the years from Dee Clark to James Blunt.

But the American space agency has discovered that in reality raindrops are shaped rather like the rather more prosaic top of a hamburger bun, round at the top and flat at the bottom.”

See the full article/video here:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/10633999/Nasa-scientists-rain-floods-hamburger-space.html

[Image: Telegraph]

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Burger Fact #5


When was the term hamburger first documented?

From Wikipedia:

Restaurant menus

The first printed American menu which listed hamburger was an 1826 menu from Delmonico’s in New York.

Between 1871-1884, “Hamburg Beefsteak” was on the “Breakfast and Supper Menu” of the Clipper Restaurant at 311/313 Pacific Street in San Fernando. It cost 10 cents—the same price as mutton chops, pig’s feet in batter, and stewed veal. It was not, however, on the dinner menu, only “Pig’s Head” “Calf Tongue” and “Stewed Kidneys” were listed.

Hamburger Steak, Plain and Hamburger Steak with Onions, was served at the Tyrolean Alps Restaurant at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair.

Burger Fact #4


From Wikipedia:

Invention of meat choppers

Referring to ground beef as hamburger dates to the invention of the mechanical meat choppers during the 1800s. The meat grinder was purportedly invented by Dr. Karl Drais in the 19th century. It wasn’t until the early nineteenth century that wood, tin, and pewter cylinders with wooden plunger pushers became common. Patents were filed for some designs that were interpreted as meat choppers.

  • E. Wade received Patent Number x5348 on January 26, 1829 for what may be the first

patented “Meat Cutter.” The patent shows choppers moving up and down onto a rotating block.

  • G. A. Coffman received Patent #3935 on February 28, 1845 for an “Improvement in Machines for Cutting Sausage-Meat” using a spiral feeder and rotating knives something like a modern food grinder.

Burger Fact #3


“Hamburg Steak” – the beginnings of the Hamburger we know today.

From Wikipedia:

“In the late eighteenth century, the largest ports in Europe were in Germany. Sailors who had visited the ports of Hamburg, Germany and New York, brought this food and term “Hamburg Steak” into popular usage. To attract German sailors, eating stands along the New York city harbor offered “steak cooked in the Hamburg style.” In 1802, the Oxford English Dictionary defined Hamburg steak as salt beef. It had little resemblance to the hamburger we know today. It was a hard slab of salted minced beef, often slightly smoked, mixed with onions and breadcrumbs. The emphasis was more on durability than taste.

Immigrants to the United States from German-speaking countries brought with them some of their favorite foods. One of them was Hamburg Steak. The Germans simply flavored shredded low-grade beef with regional spices, and both cooked and raw it became a standard meal among the poorer classes. In the seaport town of Hamburg, it acquired the name Hamburg steak. Today, this hamburger patty is no longer called Hamburg Steak in Germany but rather “Frikadelle,” “Frikandelle” or “Bulette,” originally Italian and French words.”

Burger Fact #2


Did Genghis Kahn invent the hamburger?

From Wikipedia:

1206-1227 – Genghis Khan (1167–1227), crowned the “emperor of all emperors,” and his army of fierce Mongol horsemen, known as the “Golden Horde,” conquered two thirds of the then known world. The Mongols were a fast-moving, cavalry-based army that rode small sturdy ponies. They stayed in their saddles for long period of time, sometimes days without ever dismounting. They had little opportunity to stop and build a fire for their meal.

The entire village would follow behind the army on great wheeled carts called “yurts,” leading huge herds of sheep, goats, oxen, and horses. Ground or chopped meat was handy for the soldiers, as they needed something which they could eat by hand while riding. They would use scrapings of lamb or mutton which were formed into flat patties. They softened the meat by placing them under the saddles of their horses while riding into battle. When it was time to eat, the meat would be eaten raw, having been tenderized by being pressed between the saddle and the back of the horse.”

Burger Fact #1


Where did the term hamburger or burger come from you ask?

From Wikipedia:

“The term hamburger originally derives from the German city of Hamburg, Germany’s second largest city, from where many emigrated to America. In high German, “Burg” means “castle”, or king’s abode; earlier also city/town, and is a widespread component of city names. “Burger” describes someone coming from that castle or town, (compare London -> Londoner), hence Hamburger can be a descriptive noun in German, referring to something from Hamburg. Similarly, frankfurter and wiener, names for other meat-based foods, are also used in German as descriptive nouns for people or things from the cities of Frankfurt and Wien (Vienna), respectively. The term “burger” is associated with many different types of sandwiches similar to a hamburger.